Dr. Timothy Miller’s research focuses on bringing novel therapeutic strategies to neurodegenerative diseases. As we work toward the goal of bringing these new therapies to human clinical trial, our exciting research often attracts national and international attention.


Update #2: Impact of COVID-19 on ALS Research

Hosts: Jinsy A. Andrews, MD, MSc, Columbia University Medical Center and Timothy M. Miller, MD, PhD, Washington University (NEALS Co-Chairs) Panelists: Richard Bedlack, MD, PhD, Duke ALS Clinic; Merit Cudkowicz, MD, Sean M. Healey & AMG Center for ALS at Mass General Hospital; Pamela Kittrell, MSN, RN, CCRC, UT Health San Antonio; Jeffrey D. Rothstein, […]

Impact of COVID-19 on ALS Clinical Research

Hosts: Jinsy A. Andrews, MD, MSc, Columbia University Medical Center and Timothy M. Miller, MD, PhD, Washington University (NEALS Co-Chairs) Panelists: Richard Bedlack, MD, PhD, Duke ALS Clinic; James D. Berry, MD, MPH, Sean M. Healey & AMG Center for ALS at Mass General Hospital; Merit Cudkowicz, MD, Sean M. Healey & AMG Center for ALS […]

Miller receives international innovation prize

Recognized for developing experimental treatment for ALS Timothy Miller, MD, PhD, the David Clayson Professor of Neurology at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and a group of his colleagues have received the inaugural Healey Center International Prize for innovation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) research from the Sean M. Healey & AMG […]

Healey Center International Prize for Innovation in ALS Award

The award goes to Timothy Miller, MD, PhD, of Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Don Cleveland, PhD, of the Ludwig Institute at the University of California at San Diego, Richard Smith, MD, of the Center of Neurological Study in La Jolla, California, Toby Ferguson, MD, PhD, for Biogen and Frank Bennett, PhD, […]

Experimental Drug Shows Promise for Genetic Form of ALS

An early stage trial of an investigational therapy for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) suggests that people could tolerate the experimental drug and, in exploratory results, the experimental drug was linked to possible slower progression in people with a genetic form of the disease caused by mutations in a gene called superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1).